Friday, May 9, 2014

Who are you?

It’s hard to fathom how many different kinds of butterflies and moths there are in the world until you attempt to identify one.  Can you believe I just spent about forty-five minutes trying to give this guy a name?


The Postman is feeling a little randy.
As it turns out, I’m still not sure if it is a Piano Key Butterfly or a Postman Butterfly.  But, I guess it really doesn’t matter for my purposes, which is just to show off the photos I took when I went to Magic Wings with my daughter Carrie last week.  In fact, I came across a site on the Interweb that says that the Piano Key and the Postman are one and the same.  So I will go along with that bit of wisdom.  It is the Heliconius Melpomene.  Yes, it does makes me feel smart to spout the Latin name even though I managed to wriggle my  way out of taking Latin 2 in high school.

This beauty is the Cairns Birdwing (or Ornithoptera euphorion) and is a native of Australia.


And here is the Euploea core aka the Common Crow butterfly.  He is common in south Asia.  This particular Common Crow was having a hard time settling down.  I just love those spots.


This is the aptly named Zebra Longwing or Heliconius charithonia.  He is found in South and Central America and as far north as Texas and Florida.


This Malabar Tree Nymph (Idea malabarica) was interested in Carrie’s camera.  This species is normally found in India.  I think this is one of the jauntiest butterflies going so I call it the Prom Dress Butterfly.


But, here’s my particular favorite because I love blue.  It’s known as Peleides Blue Morpho, Common Morpho, or The Emperor (Morpho peleides).  This butterfly is found in Mexico, Central America and northern South America.  Can you imagine stepping out your front door and finding these flying around?  That would be sweet.


We had a terrific time at Magic Wings.  I am grateful to have a place to go to see these magnificent creatures in the flesh.  But both Carrie and I decided that we won’t be going back until it gets cold out again.  I guess butterflies like the kind of weather that makes me feel like a wet rag.  That’s not so great when it’s 70 or 80 degrees out F. but does feel nice when it’s 10 degrees F. out.

The butterflies seemed particularly active when we were there.  Could it be mating season?

video

16 comments:

TexWisGirl said...

incredible exotics. just beautiful. the only one i knew was zebra longwing. :)

Pamela Gordon said...

What a gorgeous variety of butterflies! They are so pretty.

Linda Friedmann said...

I love looking at butterfly photos, and Magic Wings is a wondrous place. I love to get their $1.00 identification page to see how many I can find. Thanks for sharing.

Beth @ "E." Lizard Breath Speaks said...

i will say no matter what their name(s) (are) is - they are all so unique & lovely. wow, what gorgeous creatures. i always wonder how decide they are moths or butterflies. i know there is a difference. guess i need to look it up. i appreciate that you took the time to research. i have been in a similar situation & it is very tough. you end up learning way more than you thought you would. ha. ha!! ( :

Tina Fariss Barbour said...

Oh, my, you have some BEAUTIFUL photos here! I enjoyed looking at these so much. I think my favorite is the very first one, though the Blue Morpho is lovely, too.

I don't know the names of animals and plants like i'd like to. I feel bad that I don't know the names of all the trees in my neighborhood. I think I need to start walking around with a field guide. :-)

Lydia Martin said...

Oh you are SO fortunate to be able to have one of these near enough to go to...the last one I went to was in FL...some of the butters you have captured I saw there...BTW? Carrie has a great camera...I started out with a Lumix and still wish I hadn't sold it....beautiful images!

barbara l. hale said...

This is Carrie's second Lumix as she inherited mine when I graduated to the Nikon. They are indeed great cameras and sometimes I envy her the fact that it is so light weight. Of course, the camera doesn't make the photographer, the photographer makes the camera do the right thing.

Debbie said...

A butterfly house, heaven on earth!! Gorgeous captures of your magical experience!!

Gail Dixon said...

My first thought on the first butterfly was "postman", but I don't know for sure. These are beautiful images...wow. The butterfly on the camera is awesome! Never have seen that before.

Brian King said...

I don't know most butterflies, but these are gorgeous! Awesome colors!

Robert Nicolaescu said...

Wonderful series!

Lynn said...

gorgeous shots, the butterfly on the camera tickles my fancy..

Nowy Sacz said...

what equipment do these beautiful butterflies?

Nicki said...

Wow - these are outstanding photos. I especially like the one on the camera - but all the butterflies are stunning.

Helma said...

All these beautiful butterflies Barbara, and yes, it is also difficult to identify them. I have enjoyed all the beautiful colors they have :-)

Beatrice P. Boyd said...

Butterfly exhibits are colorful and so very warm and humid, I agree, Barbara. But the beauty captured is worth the discomfort as you have shown us here. Although I do agree that a colder weather visit would be nicer.